Geneva Bioretention Pilot Project

Geneva Bio Ret Pil Prj-Screenshot 2022-05-18 135902

Project Summary

The existing treatment facility along Austin Street was constructed around 2008. Due to flooding concerns, a portion of the upper system is not currently in use. The new system will install an impermeable liner to address the flooding downstream, pre-settle the stormwater to reduce sediment entering the infiltration area, and distribute the flows evenly throughout the treatment system. Typical Bioretention soil is not recommended near phosphorus-sensitive waters like Lake Whatcom. Instead, the system will use the new High Performance Bioretention Soil Mix (HPBSM) designed to capture phosphorus and other pollutants better.

Contact Us

  1. Ben Kuiken

    Project Engineer

    bkuiken@co.whatcom.wa.us
    360-778-6303
    322 N. Commercial St., Suite 224
    Bellingham, WA 98225

Project Overview

  • Status - Design
  • Next Steps - Permitting, Dept of Ecology reviews
  • Schedule - 60% Design-August 2022, 90% Design-November 2022, Bid-February 2023, Construction-Summer 2023, Ongoing Monitoring-2023 through 2025
  • Engineer - Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.
  • Construction Contractor - To be determined
  • Construction Costs - Determined through a competitive bid

 

Project Updates

Residents of the Geneva Neighborhood are invited to a public meeting for the Geneva Bioretention Pilot Project. Construction is scheduled for the Summer of 2023. The meeting time and location are below:

Date: Monday, August 29, 2022

Time: 6:00 - 8:00pm 

Location: Alpine Room

Address: The Firs Retreat Center

                 4615 Cable St.

                 Bellingham, WA 98229

Project Benefits

  • Replace failing system
  • Improve water quality
  • Development of a new treatment technology

The existing treatment facility along Austin Street was constructed circa 2008. Due to reports of flooding the system needed to be taken off-line. The system experienced uneven sediment distribution, sediment impedes infiltration through the media. Typical Bioretention soil is not recommended near phosphorus sensitive waters like Lake Whatcom.

The new system will install an impermeable liner to address the flooding downstream, will pre-settle the stormwater to reduce sediment entering the infiltration, and will distribute the flows more evenly throughout the treatment system. The system will use a new High Performance Bioretention Soil Mix (HPBSM) that is designed to be better at capturing phosphorus and other pollutants. 

  1. Funding
  2. Financial Updates
  3. Project Documents

$971,250 Department of Ecology

$250,000 REET

$268,000 LWSU